Android This Week: Facebook Phone status; MyTouch 4G Slide arrives; Nook Color tablet — Mobile Technology News

The $49 HTC Status pairs a small, 2.6-inch, 480& 215;320 resolution touchscreen with a hardware keyboard for fast typing. The 600 MHz processor and 512 MB of memory won’t set any speed records, however, the Status does include two video cameras,Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, 3G connectivity, and GPS, so it’s not lacking any major features.

Facebook

Facebook

Actually, a new wireless product is pretty quick: the camera on the myTouch 4G Slide. This Android 2.3.4 handset is expected out by the end of the month for $199.99 and T-Mobile sent me one for review. Yes, the 1.2 dual-core processor keeps this phone moving along quickly, but I may be more impressed by the 8 megapixel camera.

A new BurstMode feature captures five photos in immediate succession; perfect for sporting events or any other action-packed scenario. The camera also has a zero shutter lag function that speeds up the photo-taking process. A wide aperture (f/2.2) helps for low light conditions and the smartphone supports wide, panoramic picture-taking through an option called SweepShot.

On the tablet front, no new Android slates appeared this week, but an old favorite resurfaced: the Nook Color eReader. No, that’s not a typo: at $249, the Nook Color is becoming a favorite of many who want an inexpensive Android tablet that’s still a capable little device.

It’s relatively easy enough for anyone who’s tech-savvy to root the color eReader and install custom Android software on the Nook Color. But some enterprising folks have made the process as simple as inserting a microSD memory card into the Nook Color and powering it on. The card can be purchased for as low as $35 and comes pre-installed with software both for use as an Android tablet or as a standard Nook Color ebook reader.



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Twitter Testing Facebook-Like Message Wall

The feature addresses a problem among new users: namely, that many of Twitter’s functions are not intuitive. New users must learn, either through guides or by observing other users, how to send replies and direct messages.

Facebook

Facebook

The feature the San Francisco-based company is currently testing should help address that problem, helping users discover early on how to interact with others on the service.

That seems reasonable. Not a big deal really, just taking out a step of having to type it out. I prefer TweetDeck method of starting to type out the user’s account name and then it suggesting it to you, but whatevs.

This move is likely targeted at brand new users that are trying to figure out how Twitter works, though. So for the most part they are probably not yet familiar with 3rd party clients.

Oh, before anything, hope this development won’t make Twitter crash like crazy back in the day and Twitter developers, pls. do mind the bloat . Thanks

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